Friday, September 30, 2016

Antimicrobial Effects of Royal Jelly Confirmed

Deserving of its name, Royal Jelly is indeed very remarkable! Not only does it provide hormonal support in men and women, acts as a "brain booster" aiding mental capacities, it also has significant antimicrobial force, especially against Gram positive bacteria. 

Royal Jelly: An Ancient Remedy with Remarkable Antibacterial Properties
Microbiol Res. 2016 Nov

Royal Jelly (RJ), a honeybee hypopharyngeal gland secretion of young nurse and an exclusive nourishment for bee queen, has been used since ancient times for care and human health and it is still very important in traditional and folkloristic medicine, especially in Asia within the apitherapy.

Recently, RJ and its protein and lipid components have been subjected to several investigations on their antimicrobial activity due to extensive traditional uses and for a future application in medicine. Antimicrobial activities of crude Royal Jelly, Royalisin, 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid, Jelleines,

Major Royal Jelly Proteins against different bacteria have been reported. All these beehive products showed antimicrobial activities that lead their potential employment in several fields as natural additives. RJ and its derived compounds show a highest activity especially against Gram positive bacteria. The purpose of this Review is to summarize the results of antimicrobial studies of Royal Jelly following the timescale of the researches.

From the first scientific applications to the isolation of the single components in order to better understand its application in the past years and propose an employment in future studies as a natural antimicrobial agent.

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Honey is for Horses and Humans, Heals Wounds

The take-away from this study is that honey heals wounds, certainly raw honey (unheated & unfiltered) which contains Lactic Acid Bacteria. Many studies have demonstrated its healing capacity with regards to wounds but the researchers chose hard-to-heal wounds that took more than a year to heal! The results are very impressive, as antibiotic-resistant strains are becoming more commonplace in medical establishments.

Fighting Off Wound Pathogens in Horses with Honeybee Lactic Acid Bacteria
Current Microbiology October 2016

In the global perspective of antibiotic resistance, it is urgent to find potent topical antibiotics for the use in human and animal infection. Healing of equine wounds, particularly in the limbs, is difficult due to hydrostatic factors and exposure to environmental contaminants, which can lead to heavy bio-burden/biofilm formation and sometimes to infection. Therefore, antibiotics are often prescribed. Recent studies have shown that honeybee-specific lactic acid bacteria (LAB), involved in honey production, and inhibit human wound pathogens.

The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects on the healing of hard-to-heal equine wounds after treatment with these LAB symbionts viable in a heather honey formulation. For this, we included ten horses with wound duration of >1 year, investigated the wound microbiota, and treated wounds with the novel honeybee LAB formulation. We identified the microbiota using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and DNA sequencing. In addition, the antimicrobial properties of the honeybee LAB formulation were tested against all wound isolates in vitro.

Our results indicate a diverse wound microbiota including fifty-three bacterial species that showed 90 % colonization by at least one species of Staphylococcus. Treatment with the formulation promoted wound healing in all cases already after the first application and the wounds were either completely healed (n = 3) in less than 20 days or healing was in progress. Furthermore, the honeybee LAB formulation inhibited all pathogens when tested in vitro.

Consequently, this new treatment option presents as a powerful candidate for the topical treatment of hard-to-heal wounds in horses. 

The rapid, painless healing of hard-to-heal equine wounds gives us reason to believe that the honeybee LAB formulation presents a new topical option in future wound healing. This new treatment may be a stepping-stone toward an alternative solution for treating other infected wounds in animals and humans and warrants further investigation.